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Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Let's Get Lost (Review)


Let's Get Lost
By: Adi Alsaid

Five strangers. Countless adventures. One epic way to get lost. 

Four teens across the country have only one thing in common: a girl named LEILA. She crashes into their lives in her absurdly red car at the moment they need someone the most. 

There's HUDSON, a small-town mechanic who is willing to throw away his dreams for true love. And BREE, a runaway who seizes every Tuesday—and a few stolen goods along the way. ELLIOT believes in happy endings…until his own life goes off-script. And SONIA worries that when she lost her boyfriend, she also lost the ability to love. 

Hudson, Bree, Elliot and Sonia find a friend in Leila. And when Leila leaves them, their lives are forever changed. But it is during Leila's own 4,268-mile journey that she discovers the most important truth— sometimes, what you need most is right where you started. And maybe the only way to find what you're looking for is to get lost along the way.



Let's Get Lost has been my single most anticipated read of the summer. I didn't know how much I wanted it until BEA, where it had a pretty big buzz, although I couldn't manage to snag a copy. But then the fine folks at Harlequin Teen sent one over and I finally got my chance!

I think what I appreciate most about Let's Get Lost is the technical skills. I wish that I could craft a story like that. My favorite part about it, is that is seems to thrive on two interconnected rhythms. When I was reading, it reminded of a musical class I took a long time ago. Let's Get Lost just has this musicality aspect to it which is absolutely thrilling. 

First there are the minor stories, told from five different perspectives: Hudson, Bree, Elliot, Sonia, and Leila. While the story is ostentatiously about Leila, it's also the story of the other four characters. Each story is has it's own crescendo. There is this intensity that gradually increases because all the characters are dealing with something. They are all on the physical journey but the physical journey is just a metaphor for their own personal journey.

Along with that rhythm that is steadily increasing and crashing, because each perspective has it's own individual story (climax included), there is also this baseline rhythm to the story. This steady beat that ties it all together. While I preferred the musicality of the five individual stories, I knew that this baseline rhythm was what tied the story together. I just found that part to be a little stale. 

To be honest, I was more impressed as an aspiring writer than reader. I loved the way that Alsaid constructed this adventure. However there is something about Let's Get Lost that didn't engage me in the way that I wanted it to. 

While I liked the road trip adventure, there wasn't one character that I particularly related to. I didn't feel like I was a Hudson, a Bree, an Elliot, a Sonia, or a Leila. Why I understood their struggle and sympathized with them (especially Hudson because he was the most similar to me, I guess), I didn't see myself in them or in this story. 

However, I'd still recommend this novel. It's really awesome and despite the fact that I couldn't see myself in these characters, I feel like other can and will. Even if you're like me and you don't, you'll probably still enjoy it because it's just such quality writing and craftsmanship that you'll want to soak up in this world for a little bit. 

ARC was provided by Publisher for an honest and unbiased opinion. 

10 comments:

  1. That sounds amazing, Aly! Comparing the book to music almost has me sold! :) The switching POVs is something I'm wary about, but since you liked it so much I'm willing to give it a try (if my massive TBR allows it)

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    1. I'm totally with you about the switching povs. I'm usually wary of it because more authors get it wrong than right (in my opinion), but I think in this case it works because of the underlying purpose of it. It's like these five characters are in their own self-contained world but it's interconnected, and the pov shift just emphasizes the interconnectedness of our worlds.

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  2. Great review! I'm really looking forward to picking this one up and I hope I can relate to at least one of the characters so I connect to the book.

    Happy Reading Aly,
    Patrick @ The Bookshelves

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    1. You should definitely give it a try! Even though I didn't connect to the characters, I really enjoyed it.

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  3. I heard lots of great reviews for this book and I'm hoping to get to read it soon! I hope that I'll be able to check out the musical aspect the book has. :)

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    1. Yeah, I am totally enamored with the musicality aspect of the novel. It makes it stand out and it's just so unique. It's like each pov is a short story that has a beginning, middle, and end, but at the same same they work together to create this larger story. Which is so great (and I imagine so hard to do).

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  4. I have an arc of this one but i havent given it a chance yet and you make me feel terrible for it LOL! This one sounds like such an enjoyable read. I'm moving it up next on my TBR!

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    1. I met Adi Alsaid at BEA and ever since I had a conversation about the book, I wanted to read it. As an aspiring writing, I'm envious.

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  5. This one sounds interesting. Adding to my TBR list.

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    1. It is! I can't wait to see what you think of it, when you read it.

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